New England Trail Review

Mushrooms and Fungi

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 All the many fungi, with and without the classic mushroom shape. 

 

 Images 1 to 5 of 234

West Peak / Metacomet Trail - Cedar Apple Rust and Slug

This strange flower of jello was found near the trail. Afterward, we discovered that it was a form of a special kind of plant fungus called "cedar-apple rust". This fungus alternates between cedars and apple trees and so is most often found in orchards that have been abandoned, or in yards where both trees are used for ornamentals. Slugs apparently like these as they like to eat mushrooms.  These "flowers" are spore masses, and are in that way similar to mushrooms. They can be especially unnerving when found in trees, where they look like alien slime invaders.

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5/28/2005

West Peak / Metacomet Trail - Unidentified Slimy Mushroom

This mushroom may be a "Parrot" mushroom (Hygrophorus pittacinus).

Many mushrooms have slime coatings, for reasons not well understood. It may simply be a side effect of their growth process, it may protect the mushroom from bacteria or insects, or it may have some other purpose.

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5/28/2005

West Peak / Metacomet Trail - Closeup Unidentified Fungus or Slime Mold On Wood Grain

This closer look at an unidentified organism that is crusting the surface of a log suggests that the material may be a slime mold. Usually these sorts of granular crusts are the thousands of fruiting bodies that form when the slime mold completes its migration and transforms from a collection of undifferentiated ameobae into the form that will release spores for the next generation.

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5/28/2005

West Peak / Metacomet Trail -Unidentified Fungus or Slime Mold On Wood Grain

This unusual rotted log shows a nearly complete infestation from some fungus, mold or slime mold. The organism seems to prefer the high edges of the grain, which is unusual. Normally, spores would lodge in the crevices where the grain is worn away.

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5/28/2005

Harts Pond / Fall - Possible Hypomyces lactifluorum Beginning

This muishroom, like another seen on this same day, may be suffering from an infestation by another fungus (Hypomyces lactifluorum). In this case, the infestation may be just beginning.

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10/29/2005

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Mushrooms, Fungi , Lichens and Slime Molds


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